Chinese medicine

5 Myths About Acupuncture

The Inside Scoop on Cholesterol and The One Chinese Herb That Could Crush It

hawthorn-01According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people who suffer from high LDL cholesterol are twice as likely to develop heart disease – the number one cause of death in both men and women (source). High levels of LDL cholesterol is a serious health condition that affects approximately 71 million adults in the U.S. (1 out 3). But an ancient Chinese herb is turning heads in the medical community due to its surprisingly powerful effects on cholesterol levels.

Good vs Bad Cholesterol: What’s The Difference?

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Acupuncture Helps Irritability

Do you ever feel like you just want to scream?  Shout to the roof tops? We all suffer from irritability and moodiness from time to time, but if you find irritability is ongoing and a consequence of chronic stress in your life, then acupuncture may be a great solution for you.

Over time if your emotions aren’t released and imbalances corrected, you may find yourself dealing with more serious emotional conditions such as anxiety and depression.  Physical conditions such as digestive problems, trouble sleeping and the tendency to get sick more frequently can also result and lead to further stressors that just repeat this viscous cycle of imbalance.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, emotional disorders can be associated with a number of different patterns, however, anger, irritability, and frustration are all signs that our blood and qi (life force) is not flowing smoothly. The liver is responsible for the smooth flowing of blood and qi (life force) throughout our body and for calming our emotions. When the function of your liver is stagnant or disrupted, qi can become stuck. This is referred to as liver qi stagnation.

Liver qi stagnation is one of the most common patterns of disharmony seen in today’s patients. In addition to irritability and moodiness, signs and symptoms may include: pain in the area below the ribs, stuffiness of the chest, sighing, abdominal distention, nausea, sour regurgitation, belching, diarrhea or constipation, feeling of a lump in the throat, irregular periods, painful periods, and distention of the breasts prior to periods. Liver qi stagnation is commonly associated with PMS.

Acupuncture and Oriental medicine are excellent at relieving liver qi stagnation. Treatment for irritability and moodiness associated with liver qi stagnation focuses on moving qi and supporting the liver and spleen organ systems with acupuncture, lifestyle and nutritional recommendations.

Learn more about how acupuncture and Oriental medicine can be integrated into your emotional and physical wellness plan!  An individualized treatment plan can help you feel better quickly and safely.

Deborah Farley is a licensed acupuncturist, naturopath and owner of the Acupuncture Clinic of Richmond, in Richmond, Virginia. She’s a leading authority on using nutrition and Chinese medicine for treating symptoms and root causes of illness.  For additional resources to improve your health and wellness, visit www.debifarley.com or call 804.288.3927.

A Natural Facelift?

If you’re concerned that your youthful appearance has fallen by the wayside, you may want to consider a natural, non-surgical “refresher” – cosmetic acupuncture.

So what is Cosmetic Acupuncture? The protocol I have been most impressed with is the Mei Zen (beautiful person) Acupuncture System. After a series of 10 treatments (twice a week for five weeks), skin becomes more delicate, fine lines begin to fade, there is less sagginess and droopy eyelids, and there’s an overall improvement of skin texture and tone. And, as an added benefit, patients report an overall rejuvenation that is not confined to the face. Patients leave sessions feeling more relaxed, focused and even report improved sleep and overall energy levels throughout the day.

Chinese medicine is so advanced in terms of “anti-aging” solutions.  The underlying principles are about restoring natural beauty from the inside out. This ancient approach has worked for thousands of years, freeing up chi (energy) and improving circulation. When performing any type of cosmetic acupuncture the needles in the face are inserted at a shallower depth than in regular acupuncture.  This creates micro traumas in the body that increase the production of collagen and elastin.  This is the same process that happens when you cut your finger and new skin starts to grow.  In addition , there are meridians (pathway of energy) that run through the face and make connections to internal organs. Stimulation of specific points along these meridians balances the body and treats the underlying factors of aging process.

What are the benefits of Mei Zen Acupuncture?   

•Increases collagen production
•Reduces larger wrinkles and eliminates fine ones
•Tightens skin pores
•Prevents sagging, eye drooping
•Radiates skin, brighter eyes
•Diminishes breakouts, acne and more
•Healthier body and sense of well-being

To learn more about Mei Zen Acupuncture, visit www.debifarley.com.
Deborah Farley is a licensed acupuncturist, naturopath and owner of the Acupuncture Clinic of Richmond, in Richmond, Virginia. She’s a leading authority on using nutrition and Chinese medicine for treating symptoms and root causes of illness.  For additional resources to improve your health and wellness, visit www.debifarley.com or call 804.288.3927.

Relieve Hot Flashes with Acupuncture

A small, yet intriguing study published in Acupuncture in Medicine found that traditional Chinese acupuncture curbed the severity of hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. Fifty-three middle-aged, postmenopausal women were divided into two groups; one received such treatments twice weekly for 10 weeks, while the other experienced “sham” acupuncture with blunt needles that did not penetrate the skin. In both groups, levels of estrogen and other hormones were measured before the study began and before and after the last session. Menopausal symptoms—hot flashes, vaginal dryness, urinary tract infections and mood swings—were also measured before and after the treatments, using a five-point menopause rating scale (MRS) in order to assess their severity.

At the end of the study, the women receiving Chinese acupuncture scored significantly lower on the MRS scale, with hot flashes seeing the sharpest decrease. The researchers explain that acupuncture boosts production of endorphins, which may stabilize the temperature control system of the body. They say that more investigation is needed because the study was small, but note that its results seem promising, suggesting that traditional Chinese acupuncture could be an alternative for women unable or unwilling to use hormone replacement therapy to relieve menopausal symptoms.

Source:  This article appeared in the May 2012 issue of Natural Awakenings magazine.

Deborah Farley is a licensed acupuncturist, naturopath and owner of the Acupuncture Clinic of Richmond, in Richmond, Virginia. She’s a leading authority on using nutrition and Chinese medicine for treating symptoms and root causes of illness.  For additional resources to improve your health and wellness, visit www.debifarley.com or call 804.288.3927.